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African Drama

 
COURSE B4: AFST 290
AFRICAN DRAMA
Lecturers: Prof. Esi Sutherland and Mr. Edward Nanbigne

 

COURSE OUTLINE
Outline

The course is meant to introduce the student to African drama - traditional and modern. Indigenous dramatic traditions of Africa will be evoked to provide a context for examining the emergence of modern Drama. What is the function of Drama in society? It is intended to undertake a systematic survey of these forms and to provide students with the critical tools to both evaluate and appreciate this important art form. The course will provide students with the opportunity to observe and participate in theatrical manifestations such as plays and festivals.

Week 1(8th February)
Drama in Global Perspective
James Gibbs Nkyin-Kyin :Essays on the Ghanaian Theatre
(Introduction ppxiii - xxv)

 

Week 2. (15th February)
Drama in African Societies
Kwabena Bame, 1991 Profiles in African Traditional Culture:Consensus and Conflict.

Week 3 (22nd February)
Modern African Drama: Traditional Sources
Efua T. Sutherland - Tahinta & The Marriage of Anansewa
Students are expected to attend a performance of The Lost Fisherman at the National Theatre and prepare a journal entry.

Week 4 (1st March)
Music and Theatre
Saka Acquaye - The Lost Fisherman

Week 5 (8th March)
Analysing and reviewing theatre: Key Elements

Week 6 (15th March)
Social Change and its influence on modern African drama (1)
Ama Ata Aidoo - Anowa

Week 7(22nd March)
Social Change and its influence on modern African drama (2)
Ola Rotimi -Our Husband Has Gone Mad Again

Week 8 (29th March)
Interaction with Theatre Artistes

Week 9 (5th April )
Mohamed Ben Abdallah - The Trial of Mallam Ilya

Week 10 (12th April)
African Theatre and its derivatives: Theatre for development (1)

Week 11(19th April )
African Theatre and its derivatives: Theatre for development (1)
Practical Demonstration of Theatre for Development
By Theatre for a Change

Week 12 (26th April)
Revision of Topics

RECOMMENDED READINGS

  1. Kwabena Bame, 1991 Profiles in African Traditional Culture:Consensus and Conflict. New York. Clear type
  2. G.P. Hagan, Irene Odotei. 2000. The King Has Gone to his Village. Institute of African Studies.
  3. Eldred Jones (ed) 1976. African Literature Today, Vol. 8. London
  4. J.H. Nketia.1975. "Traditional Festivals in Ghana and Community Life Culture. Vol. III, N2
  5. A.A. Opoku. Festivals in Ghana. Ghana Publishing Corporation, Accra.
  6. Esi Sutherland-Addy. "Efua Sutherland's Children's Plays" in M. Etherton (ed) African Theatre. Vol. 6

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